August 2017

Jessica speaks about her recent paper on the 8.2 ka event on the radio program The Academic Minute. You can listen here.

June 2017

Our paper on a record of the 8.2 ka event from a coastal California speleothem is available in Nature: Scientific Reports. You can read the VU press release here.

Image of quartered and polished stalagmite WMC1. Numbers show ages and associated errors for uranimum-series dates on the stalagmite. Red numbers had larger errors and were not used in the final age model for the stalagmite proxy records. Image: J. Oster.

Image of quartered and polished stalagmite WMC1. Numbers show ages and associated errors for uranimum-series dates on the stalagmite. Red numbers had larger errors and were not used in the final age model for the stalagmite proxy records. Image: J. Oster.

August 2016

Over the summer, Jessica received an NSF Early Career Development Award to continue work with coastal and Northern California speleothem records of the last deglaciation and the Holocene. You can read the VU press release here.

September 2015

Theresa Miller (VU class of 2018) received an award for her poster presentation at the Vanderbilt Undergraduate Research Fair. Her poster describes collaborative work with Dr. Oster and  Dr. Tiffiny Tung (VU Dept. of Anthropology) studying modern precipitation and surface water isotopes in Peru and applying that knowledge to the interpretation of oxygen isotopes in the teeth of ancient humans.

Our lab's research into the modern cave environment in Tennessee is featured on Vanderbilt News.

August 2015

Jessica is one of eight researchers form Vanderbilt to be named "Inspiring Women in STEM".

May 2015

Our paper based on Chris Myers' MS research just came out in Geophysical Research letters. You can read the Vanderbilt press release here.

Chris Myers (VU MS 2014) and Sebastian Breitenbach (Cambridge) collect samples in India in 2012.

Chris Myers (VU MS 2014) and Sebastian Breitenbach (Cambridge) collect samples in India in 2012.

February, 2015

Our study of hydroclimate change at the Last Glacial Maximum has just come out in Nature Geoscience (with associated News and Views article) . You can read the press release and see a video about the research on the Vanderbilt Research page.

Our recent comparison of a network of paleoclimate proxy records with an ensemble of climate models suggests that during the Last Glacial Maximum, the south western US was wetter than present, while the northwest was drier. Model results suggest this is due to squeezing and steering of the storm track due to high pressure systems over the ice sheet and the eastern Pacific. Read the full article here.

Our recent comparison of a network of paleoclimate proxy records with an ensemble of climate models suggests that during the Last Glacial Maximum, the south western US was wetter than present, while the northwest was drier. Model results suggest this is due to squeezing and steering of the storm track due to high pressure systems over the ice sheet and the eastern Pacific. Read the full article here.